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ISPConfig 3 configuration file

ISPConfig 3 has two different configuration files, one for the server part and one for the interface.

Interface:

/usr/local/ispconfig/interface/lib/config.inc.php

Server:

/usr/local/ispconfig/server/lib/config.inc.php

The mysql root password which is only used to create new mysql databases is stored in the file:

/usr/local/ispconfig/server/lib/mysql_clientdb.conf



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How to change ISPConfig admin user password

In order to change ISPConfig administrator password you will have to connect to your MySQL using the command line. It can be done using the following command:

  • mysql -u root -p[yourrootpassword]

After that select the database called "dbispconfig". This can be done using the following command:

  • use dbispconfig; - selects the MySQL database called "dbispconfig"

Finnally execute the following command to change password :

  • UPDATE sys_user SET passwort = md5('NEWPASSWORD') WHERE username = 'admin'; - enter your desired password where text "NEWPASSWORD" is present.

After that simply connect to your ISPConfig using new admin password!

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How to Add an Admin User to the WordPress Database via MySQL


First, you need to login to phpMyAdmin and locate your WordPress database. (Below is a screenshot of a Hosting cPanel)

cPanel phpMyAdmin

Once you are in, we will be making changes to the wp_users and wp_usermeta tables. Lets go ahead and click on wp_users table.

phpMyAdmin wp_users table

We need to insert our new admin user's information, so click on the Insert tab like it shows in the image above. In the insert form, add the following:

  • ID – pick a number (in our example, we will use the number 4).
  • user_login – insert the username you want to use to access the WordPress Dashboard.
  • user_pass – add a password for this username. Make sure to select MD5 in the functions menu (Refer to the screenshot below).
  • user_nicename – put a nickname or something else that you would like to refer yourself as.
  • user_email – add the email you want to associate with this account.
  • user_url – this would be the url to your website.
  • user_registered – select the date/time for when this user is registered.
  • user_status – set this to 0.
  • display_name – put the name you like to display for this user on the site (it can be your user_nicename value as well).
  • Click on the Go Button

phpMyAdmin Insert values in wp_users table

Next we are going to have to add the values to wp_usermeta table. Click on the wp_usermeta table and then click on the Insert tab just like the previous step. Then add the following information to the insert form:

  • unmeta_id – leave this blank (it will be auto-generated)
  • user_id – this will be the id of the user you created in the previous step. Remember we picked 4.
  • meta_key – this should be wp_capabilities
  • meta_value – insert this: a:1:{s:13:"administrator";s:1:"1";}

Insert another row with the following information:

  • unmeta_id – leave this blank (it will be auto-generated)
  • user_id – this will be the id of the user you created in the previous step. Remember we picked 4.
  • meta_key – this should be wp_user_level
  • meta_value – 10

Then click on the Go button, and you have created yourself a new username. Now you should be able to login to your wp-admin with the username and password you specified for this user. Once logged in, click on Users and edit the username you just created. Go down and click on the Save button (you don't have to change anything). This will allow WordPress to go through and add some more information and clean-up the user we just added.

SQL query

For developers who want to speed this process up, you can simply drop this SQL query in your database.

1INSERT INTO `databasename`.`wp_users` (`ID`, `user_login`, `user_pass`, `user_nicename`, `user_email`, `user_url`, `user_registered`, `user_activation_key`, `user_status`, `display_name`) VALUES ('4''demo', MD5('demo'), 'pratama''test@yourdomain.com''http://computer.pratama.us/','2011-06-07 00:00:00''''0''Syed Balkhi');
2 
3 
4INSERT INTO `databasename`.`wp_usermeta` (`umeta_id`, `user_id`, `meta_key`, `meta_value`) VALUES (NULL, '4','wp_capabilities''a:1:{s:13:"administrator";s:1:"1";}');
5 
6 
7INSERT INTO `databasename`.`wp_usermeta` (`umeta_id`, `user_id`, `meta_key`, `meta_value`) VALUES (NULL, '4','wp_user_level''10');

Remember to change the databasename to the database you are working with. Also don't forget to change the appropriate values.

source:wpbeginner.com

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How to recover deleted files on Linux



On a typical file system, deleting a file doesn't necessarily mean that it is gone for good. When a file is removed, its meta data (e.g., file name, size, time, location of data block, etc.) is gone, but actual file data is untouched inside the file system, until the location of the data is overwritten by other file data. This means that if you accidentally deleted a file, there is a chance that you can recover the file.

In this tutorial, I describe how to recover deleted files on Linux. There are several file recovery tools on Linux. Among them is PhotoRec which is an open source file recovery software licensed with GPLV v2+. PhotoRec is available on Linux, BSD, MacOS X and Windows.

PhotoRec Features

As the name implies, PhotoRec is originally designed to restore accidentally deleted digital photos. However, now it has become versatile enough to support various file formats. PhotoRec recovers lost files by checking data blocks one by one against a signature database of different file types.

  • Supported file formats: video (avi, mov, mp3, mp4, mpg), image (jpg, gif, png), audio (mp3, ogg), document (doc(x), ppt(x), xls(x), html), archive (gz, zip) etc.
  • Supported file systems: EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, HFS+, FAT, NTFS, exFAT

Besides hard disks, PhotoRec can restore files stored on CD/DVD drives, USB sticks, memory cards (CompactFlash, Memory Stick, Secure Digital/SD, SmartMedia), etc. So if you accidentally lost digital pictures stored on the memory card of a digital camera, you can use PhotoRec to undelete them.

Install PhotoRec on Linux

The official site offers PhotoRec binaries for various platforms. So you can download static PhotoRec binary for your Linux system.

For 32-bit Linux:

$ wget http://www.cgsecurity.org/testdisk-6.14.linux26.tar.bz2
$ tar xvfvj testdisk-6.14.linux26.tar.bz2

For 64-bit Linux:

$ wget http://www.cgsecurity.org/testdisk-6.14.linux26-x86_64.tar.bz2
$ tar xvfvj testdisk-6.14.linux26-x86_64.tar.bz2

The PhotoRec executable (photorec_static) is found in the extracted directory.

Recover Deleted Photos and Videos

In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to recover deleted photos and video files stored on an SD card, which were generated by Canon EOS Rebel T3i.

When you have removed a file accidentally, what's important is to NOT save any more files on the same disk drive or memory card, so that you do not overwrite the deleted file.

As soon as you discover the lost files, run PhotoRec to restore them as follows.

$ sudo photorec_static

You will be shown a list of available media. Choose the media where you have deleted files.

Next, choose the partition which contains deleted files.

Choose the file system type used for the partition. In general, you can identify the file system type from the output of mountcommand. In case of the SD card used by Canon camera, it is formatted in VFAT file system. So choose "Other".

Choose if all disk space needs to be analyzed. In this case, choose "Free", which means scanning for unallocated space only.

Choose a destination folder where restored files will be stored. Here you must choose a different partition or drive than the one being analyzed. Press "C" when a destination is chosen.

Now PhotoRec starts reading individual sectors for lost files. You will see the progress of the recovery. Depending on the size of media, it will take a couple of minutes or even longer.

After scanning is completed, the restored files will be stored in the destination folder that you configured. Note that the size of a restored file may be either the same as or larger than the original file size.

source: xmodulo.com

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Bring back deleted files with lsof

There you are, happily playing around with an audio file you've spent all afternoon tweaking, and you're thinking, "Wow, doesn't it sound great? Lemme just move it over here." At that point your subconscious chimes in, "Um, you meant mv, not rm, right?" Oops. I feel your pain -- this happens to everyone. But there's a straightforward method to recover your lost file, and since it works on every standard Linux system, everyone ought to know how to do it.

Briefly, a file as it appears somewhere on a Linux filesystem is actually just a link to an inode, which contains all of the file's properties, such as permissions and ownership, as well as the addresses of the data blocks where the file's content is stored on disk. When you rm a file, you're removing the link that points to its inode, but not the inode itself; other processes (such as your audio player) might still have it open. It's only after they're through and all links are removed that an inode and the data blocks it pointed to are made available for writing.

This delay is your key to a quick and happy recovery: if a process still has the file open, the data's there somewhere, even though according to the directory listing the file already appears to be gone.

This is where the Linux process pseudo-filesystem, the /proc directory, comes into play. Every process on the system has a directory here with its name on it, inside of which lies many things -- including an fd ("file descriptor") subdirectory containing links to all files that the process has open. Even if a file has been removed from the filesystem, a copy of the data will be right here:

/proc/process id/fd/file descriptor

To know where to go, you need to get the id of the process that has the file open, and the file descriptor. These you get with lsof, whose name means "list open files." (It actually does a whole lot more than this and is so useful that almost every system has it installed. If yours isn't one of them, you can grab the latest version straight from its author.)

Once you get that information from lsof, you can just copy the data out of /proc and call it a day.

This whole thing is best demonstrated with a live example. First, create a text file that you can delete and then bring back:

$ man lsof | col -b > myfile

Then have a look at the contents of the file that you just created:

$ less myfile

You should see a plaintext version of lsof's huge man page looking out at you, courtesy of less.

Now press Ctrl-Z to suspend less. Back at a shell prompt make sure your file is still there:

$ ls -l myfile  -rw-r--r--  1 jimbo jimbo 114383 Oct 31 16:14 myfile  $ stat myfile    File: `myfile'    Size: 114383          Blocks: 232        IO Block: 4096   regular file  Device: 341h/833d       Inode: 1276722     Links: 1  Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: ( 1010/    jimbo)   Gid: ( 1010/    jimbo)  Access: 2006-10-31 16:15:08.423715488 -0400  Modify: 2006-10-31 16:14:52.684417746 -0400  Change: 2006-10-31 16:14:52.684417746 -0400  

Yup, it's there all right. OK, go ahead and oops it:

$ rm myfile  $ ls -l myfile  ls: myfile: No such file or directory  $ stat myfile  stat: cannot stat `myfile': No such file or directory  $  

It's gone.

At this point, you must not allow the process still using the file to exit, because once that happens, the file will really be gone and your troubles will intensify. Your background less process in this walkthrough isn't going anywhere (unless you kill the process or exit the shell), but if this were a video or sound file that you were playing, the first thing to do at the point where you realize you deleted the file would be to immediately pause the application playback, or otherwise freeze the process, so that it doesn't eventually stop playing the file and exit.

Now to bring the file back. First see what lsof has to say about it:

$ lsof | grep myfile  less      4158    jimbo    4r      REG       3,65   114383   1276722 /home/jimbo/myfile (deleted)  

The first column gives you the name of the command associated with the process, the second column is the process id, and the number in the fourth column is the file descriptor (the "r" means that it's a regular file). Now you know that process 4158 still has the file open, and you know the file descriptor, 4. That's everything you have to know to copy it out of /proc.

You might think that using the -a flag with cp is the right thing to do here, since you're restoring the file -- but it's actually important that you don't do that. Otherwise, instead of copying the literal data contained in the file, you'll be copying a now-broken symbolic link to the file as it once was listed in its original directory:

$ ls -l /proc/4158/fd/4  lr-x------  1 jimbo jimbo 64 Oct 31 16:18 /proc/4158/fd/4 -> /home/jimbo/myfile (deleted)  $ cp -a /proc/4158/fd/4 myfile.wrong  $ ls -l myfile.wrong  lrwxr-xr-x  1 jimbo jimbo 24 Oct 31 16:22 myfile.wrong -> /home/jimbo/myfile (deleted)  $ file myfile.wrong  myfile.wrong: broken symbolic link to `/home/jimbo/myfile (deleted)'  $ file /proc/4158/fd/4  /proc/4158/fd/4: broken symbolic link to `/home/jimbo/myfile (deleted)'  

So instead of all that, just a plain old cp will do the trick:

$ cp /proc/4158/fd/4 myfile.saved

And finally, verify that you've done good:

$ ls -l myfile.saved  -rw-r--r--  1 jimbo jimbo 114383 Oct 31 16:25 myfile.saved  $ man lsof | col -b > myfile.new  $ cmp myfile.saved myfile.new  

No complaints from cmp -- your restoration is the real deal.

Incidentally, there are a lot of useful things you can do with lsof in addition to rescuing lost files.

source: http://archive09.linux.com/articles/58142

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